PETA: PETA Asia Rushes to Help Animals After Disastrous Fire Breaks Out in the Philippines

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(PETA) This post was originally published on PETAAsia.com.

After hearing about a devastating fire in Bacoor, a city in Cavite, Philippines, PETA Asia’s Animal Rescue Team rushed to the scene to help affected animals, many of whom sustained severe burns and other injuries.

The team treated several animals who had injuries caused by the fire, including infected burn wounds.PETA Asia Rushes to Help Animals After Disastrous Fire Breaks Out in the Philippines

The team also gave antibiotics, antiseptics, and burn-treatment cream to a woman whose dog had burn wounds on his back and leg.

What You Can Do

Have a plan to ensure animals’ safety in the event of a disaster. Whether the emergency is a flood, a fire, or an earthquake, evacuees should never assume that they’ll be able to return home soon, despite any assurances to the contrary. There’s no way of knowing what may happen to your home while you’re away, and you may not be able to return for days or even weeks. Companion animals who are left behind may become malnourished and dehydrated or escape in fear and become lost.

To keep animals safe during disasters, follow these simple steps:

  • Make sure that your animals wear collars with ID tags and that you have a current photo of them for identification purposes.
  • Keep a list of hotels that accept animal companions (and remember that others often lift “no pets” policies during emergencies). And include your local animal-welfare society’s phone number on your list of important contacts—it might be able to provide information during a disaster.
  • Keep a carrier, a leash, extra food, and any other supplies that your animals might need packed and ready to go so that you can grab them easily if you have to evacuate in a hurry.
  • Support PETA’s Global Compassion Fund

     

The post PETA Asia Rushes to Help Animals After Disastrous Fire Breaks Out in the Philippines appeared first on PETA.

Learn more at www.peta.org.

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